Serbia backs down over curfew that sparked violent protests

By bne IntelliNews July 9, 2020

Serbia’s government gave up on a planned weekend curfew in Belgrade on July 9 following two nights of violent protests but imposed other restrictions as the number of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases is rising.

Serbia has been shaken by protests since July 7 when President Aleksandar Vucic announced that a curfew will be implemented in Belgrade with people banned from going out between Friday evening and Monday morning.

In response, the authorities gave up the plan but banned gatherings of more than 10 people in public areas in Belgrade, where 80% of all cases are registered.

Also, all indoor shops and restaurants will have shortened working hours.

Prime Minister Ana Brnabic said in a statement that these measures are temporary and the authorities will monitor the situation to decide on further steps.

She added that, if necessary, more restrictions will be imposed.

Meanwhile, b92 quoted Brnabic as saying that the government gave up the curfew as it would require the government to declare a state of emergency to be legally allowed to impose it, which is not necessary at the moment.

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